IDIOM – TO BE IN THE SAME BOAT

IDIOM – TO BE IN THE SAME BOAT MEANING – to be in the same bad, difficult or unpleasant situation, to have the same problem EXAMPLES – 1. The economy is terrible at the moment.  All the local businesses are struggling.  They are all in the same boat.  2.  John and I failed our history test.  As, we’re both in …

IDIOM – TO BE LIKE TWO PEAS IN A POD

 Idiom – TO BE LIKE TWO PEAS IN A POD.  You will also find this written as to be as alike as two peas in a pod. Meaning – (1)  when two things are so similar that there is very little difference between them. This idiom can be used to talk about physical characteristics as well as character.  (2) This …

IDIOM – AS EASY AS PIE

Meaning of As Easy as Pie – something which is very simple or easy.  Interestingly, the Idiom ‘as easy as pie’, does not refer to making pies bur rather to eating them!  In fact, there are many English idioms which use the word pie to indicate something that is pleasurable or good.  There’s also another version of this idiom which is …

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IDIOM – PIECE OF CAKE

Meaning –  something that is easy to do In Context  – The exam was a piece of cake.  I had no problems answering any of the questions. Synonymous Idioms – as easy as pie, a walk in the park, like stealing candy from a baby, a walkover, as easy as the ABC, like shooting fish in a barrel, a cakewalk, nothing …

IDIOM – OFF THE RECORD

Meaning – something which is not to be repeated or which is said in an unofficial capacity.  This idiom is often used when the speaker prefers to remain anonymous. In Context  – Journalists cannot publish anything which is said off the record when they are interviewing someone. Origin –  This phrase is first attributed to Roosevelt in 1932.  In English,  …

IDIOM – TO SWITCH OFF & ON

Meaning (1) – The literal meaning of the verb to switch on or off means to start or stop just about anything that uses electricity or needs some other form of power to be used.  So, you can switch on the lights, switch on an engine, switch off the T.V. In Context  (1) –  Can you switch on the heater?  …

IDIOM – TO BE BROKE

Meaning – to be out of money, not having any cash.  Use this idiom when you want to express that someone can’t afford to pay for something. In Context  – I can’t go to the concert.  I‘m broke. Origin – ‘to be broke’ is an idiom which uses an old form / meaning of the verb.  The verb ‘to break’ …

IDIOM – EXCUSE MY FRENCH

    Meaning – this idiom is used to excuse a person for swearing or using bad language.  Variations include pardon my French, excuse my French. Origin – The origin of the expression is unclear.  However, there are a number of similar expressions (in French as well as in English) which deflect the blame for the use of a culturally …